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The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 01 Jul 2008, 09:24
by Kashgar
The votes are in and after seventy years the countdown is about to begin. Watch this space.

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 02 Jul 2008, 13:29
by Kashgar
As a small personal addition to the Beano's 70th anniverary celebrations this month I thought it might be of some interest to catalogue the 100 most successful strips and stories that have appeared in its three score years and ten existence. I'll be displaying the results, usually at the rate of five per day across the month, in the traditional manner 100-96, 95-91 etc and please feel free to speculate on what the order of the Top Ten might be ( I think the top five is too easy).
To start things off I'll begin with the strip that just failed to make the Top 100
101) Paddy's Private Army (48 issues) Two series of this WWII adventure strip set in Japanese occupied Singapore appeared in 1961 and 1965 in which a young British lad, seperated from his mother, organises his friends and pets into a small military force to fight the invader. Artwork throughout was by James 'Peem' Walker.
Next Nos 100-96

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 02 Jul 2008, 14:08
by Peter Gray
Wow! Kashgar this will be amazing...
makes me want to read that story...wonder if anyone had experience in World war 2 who wrote the strip... in Japanese occupied Singapore.
Lord Snooty must be in the top 5...or maybe thats changed now...
thanks for giving artists names as well...looking forward to your list...I'll learn a lot.. 8) `
100 could be Jinxs...Wonder boy..?

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 03 Jul 2008, 08:32
by Steve Bright
Karate Sid at number 458? :wink:

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 03 Jul 2008, 10:04
by Kashgar
Ah! ye of little faith Steve! Check out No 98.

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 03 Jul 2008, 10:14
by Kashgar
Here goes!

100) Danny on a Dolphin (50). Another two series, WWII adventure strip from the early 1960's (1060, 1962) in this instance featuring a lad with a remarkable empathy with a certain group on ocean-going mammals, a talent that holds him in good stead when he is forced into conflict not only with the Japanese army but also with a gang of pirates. Reprinted in the boys picture paper Hornet in 1971 as Dolphin Patrol. Important as the first Beano strip drawn by the artist who would become the comics most prolific illustrator, Dave Sutherland.

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 03 Jul 2008, 10:21
by Kashgar
99) Whoopee Hank (53) Billed as 'the Slap-Dash Sheriff' Hank was a star of the Beano in its first year. His methods of catching crooks were certainly outlandish and artist Roland Davies, using a style very akin to that of cartoon animation of the early 1930's really brought the strip to life. When Roland Davies died in 1993, in his 89th year, he was the last survivor of the artistic team who had drawn something for Beano No1.

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 03 Jul 2008, 11:01
by Kashgar
98) Karate Sid (55) Obsessives and monomaniacs in comic strips come in many weird and wonderful forms and young Sid 'Master of the Martial Arts', the star of this 1987 strip, was a lad who was never out of his karate kit and, from the bottom of his perptually bared feet to the top of his suitably tonsured locks, never loathe to show of his martial art skills at any given oppurtunity.Why use a door handle when a flying kick will do! Art by Mr Steve Bright in his David Law mode.

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 03 Jul 2008, 11:08
by Kashgar
97) No entry as two tied for 96.

96) Brave Captain Kipper (57) Another strip from the Beano's first year. The silent, pantomime antics of the bewhiskered matelot having arrived in the pages of the Beano via the Torelli Bros art agency in Milan.

96) Uncle Windbag (57) Severally described as 'he tells tall tales ' and 'that story teller fella' Windbag amassed his 57 appearances in the Beano comic in three short series spread across nearly 20 years (1938, 1953, 1956). His various guises being the interpretations in turn of artists Charle Holt, Charles Grigg and Bill Ritchie.

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 03 Jul 2008, 11:10
by Steve Bright
Kashgar wrote:98) Karate Sid (55) Obsessives and monomaniacs in comic strips come in many weird and wonderful forms and young Sid 'Master of the Martial Arts', the star of this 1987 strip, was a lad who was never out of his karate kit and, from the bottom of his perptually bared feet to the top of his suitably tonsured locks, never loathe to show of his martial art skills at any given oppurtunity.Why use a door handle when a flying kick will do! Art by Mr Steve Bright in his David Law mode.
:D I'm genuinely made up, Ray. Thanks!

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 05 Jul 2008, 10:03
by Kashgar
95) The Belles of St Lemons (58) The 1971/72 adventures of a gang of less than ladylike public schoolgirls who had first been seen in the pages of the 1968 Beano Book. Artwork by Gordon Bell.

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 05 Jul 2008, 10:05
by ISPYSHHHGUY
ODHAMS done a late 60s strip called 'the DOLLS of ST. DOMINICS' that made the 'BELLES of ST. LEMONS' look like 'CHARLIE'S ANGELS!'

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 05 Jul 2008, 10:19
by Kashgar
94) Little Monkey (59) First appearing as part of the Readers Request feature in 1986
this strip took literalism to its limits with the title character, a scamp of a suburban kid with human parents, being such a 'little monkey' that he looks like one. Artwork intially and for the most part by Robert Nixon.

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 05 Jul 2008, 10:24
by Kashgar
93) Multy the Millionaire (60) The ample framed, walrus moustachioed, fur collar coated Beano millionaire first appeared in issue No 500 (1952) and immediately set about using craft, guile and ooodles of cash to make sure he got what he wanted.
Artwork by Richard Cox.

Re: The Beano Top 100.

Posted: 05 Jul 2008, 10:28
by Kashgar
92) No entry as two tied for 91.

91) Little Dead-Eye Dick (63) Billed as 'a fun-man and a gun-man' in Beano No1 Dead-Eye was a pint-sized pistol packing wonder in a cowbot outfit who amassed his Beano appearances across three short series each drawn by Charles Holt.